TAG Consulting

What Does A Dependable Organizational Culture Look Like?


October 10, 2017

An organization (or a person) is dependable if it can be relied upon to act in certain ways. If an organization honors its promises – to employees, customers, partners, vendors – over and over the it can call itself trustworthy.

In situations where other organizations might break their word or destroy trust, dependable organizations keep faith and maintain trust. As a result, people like working for and doing business organizations that are dependable.

So, what does this culture of dependability look like? It can be seen, specifically as it does three things over and over. Organizations with a culture of dependability:

  1. Make promises (and keep them). The US Constitution is a promise that makes our government and society possible. Churches, clubs, organizations of all kinds have covenants, policy manuals, systems and procedures that embody the promises which enable people to work together in an atmosphere of trust.
  2. They are consistent. People know what the organization will do and not do. When adversity or crisis strikes, their response is largely predictable. Their decisions and responses – in both good and bad times – is consistently good, consistently reliable, consistently trustworthy.
  3. They are predictable. This is related to, but different th at consistency in that consistency looks to the past and predictability looks to the future. When we have confidence that we can predict the  behavior of a person or organization then we can trust them.

Trust and a culture of dependability is built by people and organizations keeping promises and by behavior that is consistent and predictable.

Take the honest look – how does your organization rate in terms of showing a culture of dependability?

Dependability – You Can Count On It


April 3, 2017

In today’s organizations, people expect many things from their leaders, but dependability is not a word that is high on their lists. People expect power plays, unreasonable expectations, skillful politics, and my-career-first sorts of attitudes. But not dependability.

And that is precisely why dependability is so important.

When a leader is dependable it creates a sense of safety in her followers. And safety is something that is in short supply in our organizational cultures.

This is not a “soft skill”. People who feel unsafe act in self-protective ways, which shut out collaboration and are often dishonest. It’s understandable – when your wellbeing is on the line you are likely to act to protect yourself. But a bunch of people acting in self-protective ways makes for a rotting culture.

Dependability involves leaders coming through on their commitments, honoring the values the organization claims, treating people with both individuality and equity and genuinely caring for employees as people who have lives, families, interests, and needs that are outside the scope of the organization.

When people can operate within a thriving organizational culture that feels safe to them, they can venture beyond themselves. This is what allows them to belong, contribute, and make a real and lasting difference.

The One Thing Every Winning Organization Must Have


January 30, 2017

Our online employee survey, The Engagement Dashboard (TED) has collected data from hundreds of companies and thousands of employees to reveal what it takes to unlock a healthy organizational culture, with productivity, engaged employees, and the hidden talents and capabilities of its people.

TED reveals a host of dimensions that go into making a great organization, but one stands out as the only dimension in the entire survey that requires only one sentence to sum it up – Dependability.

 

Here’s the sentence:

Management can be counted upon to come through when needed.

It is nearly impossible to overstate the importance of this metric.

People will put up with almost any “what” if they get the “why”  – the knowledge that we are engaged in something great and life-altering and useful and good and we can count on our leaders.

The single question – ‘Can I count on my leaders?’ – was the only other question to correlate to every other question in TED. Dependability is nearly everything.

Dependability is all about the leader. The leader must provide the support needed and then get out of the way. The leader matter less than the cause.

Can you as a leader be counted upon to come through for people no matter what? Will you get your hands dirty, will you walk out the talk of your shared values, will you incarnate the organizational code, will you risk losing yourself to disrupt the status quo?

Can YOU be depended upon to come through when needed? And, if you are just beginning your career of leadership, are you putting into place the conditions and habits which will develop the kind of character where you will be depended upon at the end of the day?

Are you dependable? And is your organization?

To find out more about TED, click here.

Are You Dependable?


October 11, 2016

mountain-climb-link

Our research and experience reveals that there are four components that go into the trustworthy leadership which is an inevitable predictor of employee engagement:

  1. Dependability
  2. Communication
  3. Learning
  4. Integrity

Let’s look at the first component –  Dependability.

A person or organization is dependable if it can be relied upon to act in certain ways. If I do what I promise, over and over, you will view me as trustworthy and dependable. Same thing for an organization.

Dependable organizations say what they mean and mean what they say. They can be relied upon when the chips are down. In situations where lesser organizations might succumb to pressure and break their word, dependable organizations keep the faith even when the short term price feels too high. As a result, people like doing business with and working for dependable organizations.

We’ve found three characteristics of dependable organizations.

  1. They make and keep promises. This is the social and leadership contract that makes organizations of all kinds – business, governments, churches, charities, families – possible. It is the necessary foundation for trust, which is the necessary foundation for loyalty, safety, and engagement.
  2. They are consistent. Over time, dependable organizations, like dependable people, act in ways consistent with their stated values. No matter the internal stressors or external pressures, these organizations act just as they have in the past, securing the present and creating trust in the future. What was important yesterday will be important today and will be important tomorrow.
  3. They are predictable. Consistency looks to past experience. Dependability is more than a promise – it is a commitment rooted in a track record. When we have confidence that we can predict the behavior of a person or organization then we can have trust in that person or organization. Our faith in them won’t be disappointed.

At TAG Consulting, one of our highest aspirations is to help organizations live into their true selves, consistent with their values, creating a climate and culture of dependability where employees are fulfilled and fully engaged.

To read more about Dependability as one of the four factors that lead to high-level employee engagement, check out our book The Secret Sauce: Creating A Winning Culture.

The 1 Most Important Quality of a Winning Organization


February 15, 2016

Our online employee survey, The Engagement Dashboard (TED) has collected data from hundreds of companies and thousands of employees to reveal what it takes to unlock a healthy organizational culture, with productivity, engaged employees, and the hidden talents and capabilities of its people.

TED reveals a host of dimensions that go into making a great organization, but one stands out as the only dimension in the entire survey that requires only one sentence to sum it up – Dependability.

guy with chains

Here’s the sentence:

Management can be counted upon to come through when needed.

It is nearly impossible to overstate the importance of this metric.

People will put up with almost any “what” if they get the “why”  – the knowledge that we are engaged in something great and life-altering and useful and good and we can count on our leaders.

The single question – ‘Can I count on my leaders?’ – was the only other question to correlate to every other question in TED. Dependability is nearly everything.

Dependability is all about the leader. The leader must provide the support needed and then get out of the way. The leader matter less than the cause.

Can you as a leader be counted upon to come through for people no matter what? Will you get your hands dirty, will you walk out the talk of your shared values, will you incarnate the organizational code, will you risk losing yourself to disrupt the status quo?

Can YOU be depended upon to come through when needed? And, if you are just beginning your career of leadership, are you putting into place the conditions and habits which will develop the kind of character where you will be depended upon at the end of the day?

Are you dependable? And is your organization?

To find out more about TED, click here.

For Employee Engagement, Be Dependable


December 23, 2015

In a post several days ago, we shared that our research revealed that there are four components that go into the trustworthy leadership which is an inevitable predictor of employee engagement:

  1. Dependability
  2. Communication
  3. Learning
  4. Integrity

We’ll focus on each in turn. Today is Dependability.

A person or organization is dependable if it can be relied upon to act in certain ways. If I do what I promise, over and over, you will view me as trustworthy and dependable. Same thing for an organization.

Dependable organizations say what they mean and mean what they say. They can be relied upon when the chips are down. In situations where lesser organizations might succumb to pressure and break their word, dependable organizations keep the faith even when the short term price feels too high. As a result, people like doing business with and working for dependable organizations.

Like them or not, the Duke University Blue Devils are a legendary basketball program led by a legendary coach, Mike Krzyzewski. When asked to name his greatest accomplishment, “Coach K” doesn’t list the multiple conference and national championship banners or rattle off a list of first team All-Americans or cite his record-breaking win total.

His self-reported finest accomplishment? “When that kid who plays here knows that I’ve been honest with him”.

CoachK

We found these three characteristics of dependable organizations.

  1. They make and keep promises. This is the social and leadership contract that makes organizations of all kinds – business, governments, churches, charities, families – possible. It is the necessary foundation for trust, which is the necessary foundation for loyalty, safety, and engagement.
  2. They are consistent. Over time, dependable organizations, like dependable people, act in ways consistent with their stated values. No matter the internal stressors or external pressures, these organizations act just as they have in the past, securing the present and creating trust in the future. What was important yesterday will be important today and will be important tomorrow.
  3. They are predictable. Consistency looks to past experience. Dependability is more than a promise – it is a commitment rooted in a track record. When we have confidence that we can predict the behavior of a person or organization then we can have trust in that person or organization. Our faith in them won’t be disappointed.

At TAG Consulting, one of our highest aspirations is to help organizations live into their true selves, consistent with their values, creating a climate and culture of dependability where employees are fulfilled and fully engaged.