TAG Consulting

What Can I Expect From Leadership Coaching? (Video)


October 24, 2016

Beginning a relationship with one of TAG’s deeply experienced leadership coaches insures that you will have a trusted advisor by your side to navigate the changes and challenges of leadership.

But if you’re new to the idea of leadership coaching, you may be wondering what to expect. Invest less than five minutes in watching this video, and let TAG’s Shane Roberson explain how coaching works and what you can anticipate in the experience.

TAG Leadership Coaching – What To Expect from TAG Consulting on Vimeo.

How TAG Leadership Coaching Can Help You Succeed (Video)


October 17, 2016

At the heart of what we do at TAG is executive and leadership coaching. Our approach is highly personalized, and builds on the strengths of the leader being coached. Our goal is to become a trusted adviser offering perspective and counsel that strengthens both the leader and the team. At the end of the day, we care more about you as a leader than we care about the role you fill.

In this video, expert TAG coach Shane Roberson explains how working with a TAG coach can help you succeed as a leader.

 

How TAG Leadership Coaching Helps You To Succeed from TAG Consulting on Vimeo.

Healthy Leaders Know That They’re The Problem


October 12, 2016

In our work as consultants we are often called upon to help leaders and their organizations navigate conflict.

In virtually every instance the leader who enlists our help believes that he or she is not the problem. The real problem, those leaders believe, is “that person” or “those people” or “that policy or procedure” or “that department”.

We’ve seen a lot of jaws drop (and a few fists start to clench!) when we tell leaders “The problem is you!”.

Angry man pointing his finger

What we mean by that is that in every conflict, every individual involved has contributed to the impasse in some way or another. This is one of the fundamental rules of organizational life – that every member of the group is part of a system that is not working on some level.

Now, we want our clients to continue to employ us, so we finish the sentence beginning “The problem is you…” with an important clause: “…so know yourself.”

If I am aware of my limitations and failures and propensities to engage in unhealthy behavior at times then I can lead through the conflict with wisdom and skill.

The writer John Eldredge puts it this way: “What gets in the way is your way”. He means that we all have a way of relating, a manner of leading that we rarely question. And when you don’t question yourself you are not conscious of how your patterns of behavior are affecting others, creating resistance, and undermining the very goals you are committed to bringing about. But if you are willing to take an inward look, you can stop being your own worst enemy.

If you can manage yourself – know your heart and mind and understand how and why you can slip into unhealthy conflict – and then choose instead to put your ego aside for a bigger mission – you have the foundation for persevering through conflict and adversity in a way that bring about lasting change and a unified team and organization.

Do you want to take your team to the next level? Here are some of our options for team development and growth.

Ready to take your individual leadership acumen to a higher place? Check out our options for executive and leadership coaching here.

For more on navigating organizational and interpersonal conflict, read the book Red Zone/Blue Zone, which you can find here.

Welcome To The TAG Coaching Process (Video)


October 4, 2016

One of the most important things we do at TAG is coach leaders. Whatever your field of endeavor, we craft highly personalized and thoroughly relational paths of growth, change, and success. Here’s a behind the scenes look at the TAG leadership coaching process from one of our finest coaches – Shane Roberson.

 

Welcome to TAG Coaching Clients! from TAG Consulting on Vimeo.

To find out more about TAG coaching opportunities, click here!

What Are Your Leadership Habits?


September 20, 2016

tools

Try as we might not to be, we are creatures of habit.

When it comes to leadership, this habit of being habitual tends to show up as a set of “default modes”. We tend to respond in set patterns. Many of these have worked for us in the past, which only makes them all the more dangerous. It’s all too easy for yesterday’s solution to become today’s problem.

When it comes to our default modes, awareness is at least 50% of the solution. If we can understand our habits of thinking, responding, acting, and interpreting for what they are it will open up options for us to get past the default to creativity.

Our leadership habits tend to be shaped by three factors.

  1. Personal history. Whom are we loyal to, where did we come from, what forces shaped us, how did our mentors behave and think, what has worked for us in the past? All of these are powerful historical shapers of current thinking and acting. We need to consider them carefully, draw on the aspects of our personal history that are timeless, and adjust or drop the others as needed to respond to new realities.
  2. Personal wiring. Some things just set us off that would leave another unmoved. Conversely, we can accept with equanimity things that drive others nuts. Maybe you always take responsibility for others. Or maybe you disengage emotionally in trying times. Perhaps you thrive in chaos. On the other hand, you may relish order and predictability. We will naturally tend to default to situations and solutions with which we are comfortable. But if we can recognize these patterns in ourselves we can choose ways of relating and responding which might stretch us while offering us more options.
  3. Personal toolbox. What techniques have we learned, tools have we acquired, resources have we developed, learnings have we engaged in? The fewer the tools the fewer our options. The more we can add to our toolbox the more sophisticated our interpretations and decisions can be.

Carefully consider each of the factors in your leadership habits. Where are you aware? Where do you need to grow in awareness? Where do you need to try a new approach? What new tool do you need to add to your repertoire?

A leadership coach can help you understand your habits and adjust or build on them for greater effectiveness as a leader. To find our more about TAG leadership and executive coaching, click here.

Leaders – Always “Put On The Button”


July 14, 2016

nametag

TAG Senior Partner Jim Osterhaus has been a psychologist for decades and has coached hundreds of leaders and executives through his work at TAG. In today’s guest blog he tells the story of one of his most memorable encounters with a leader at a personal crossroads.

One of the most compelling interviews I ever had was with a man from Central Africa named Raphael. He was a tall, distinguished looking man in his mid-thirties who sought me out at an international conference in Amsterdam (I was part of a counseling/consulting group assembled for the conference).

I had an hour with each person to find out who they were, why they had come to see me, and offer some suggestions as to a way forward – a rather daunting task.

After exchanging pleasantries, I found out that Raphael had just become the “head man” of his region, an hereditary post that had been passed to him with the death of his father. His grandfather and great grandfather had also been head men.

I asked what a head man’s responsibilities were, and found out that he was basically the chief – the head magistrate and county executive all rolled into one. When I asked what the problem was, Raphael stated “I just can’t do the job.”

Further probing revealed that Raphael had been told by the region’s elders that he was too young and inexperienced for the job. This had led to a tentativeness on Raphael’s part which only confirmed to the elders that he couldn’t do the job. We call this a recursive pattern –  elders’ concerns leading to Raphael’s tentativeness, which confirmed the elders’ beliefs.

The community now was stuck, with a head man in a hereditary position he simply had to accept, but who was tentative and ineffective. Stuck leader; stuck followers!

I asked Raphael what was the symbol of his authority. He told me it was a button he was supposed to wear. I asked where the button was. He said, “It’s home in a drawer. I’ve never worn it.”

My intervention was to focus Raphael’s attention, remind him of his father, grandfather, and great grandfather. Then I told him to look at me.

“Raphael”, I told him. “You must go home and put on the button, and never take it off. You are the head man.”  He nodded his agreement, knowing exactly what I meant.

Often leaders come into new positions and because of a variety of reasons refuse to put on the ‘button’ of authority. Instead, they act tentatively.

This often happens when a person is elevated above his peers to be their supervisor. That new supervisor wants to still be ‘one of the group,’ and thus is unable to fully embrace the new authority. This leads to ambivalence on the part of those s/he leads, which causes those led to doubt the competence of the manager.

This creates a repeating pattern similar to the one that Raphael faced – tentative manager creates doubting followers, leading to more manager tentativeness. In these situations, I usually relate my story of Raphael, and tell the tentative manager that they must “put on the button,” and embrace their authority.

This does not mean that they have a demeanor of “I’m always right.” It does mean they begin to develop a settled confidence that they have the necessary internal tools and external resources (beginning with personnel) to tackle the issues resident in their jobs.

Jim’s counsel to Raphael is a great example of the difference a leadership or executive coach can make in the life of a leader. At just the right moment, the right question, the right piece of counsel can be the difference between a stalled career and one which goes on to new heights of service and success.

TAG has a deep bench of experienced, passionate, and skilled executive and leadership coaches. Click here to find out more and see if you are ready to take the next step in your own development as a leader!

You Are Part of The Problem…And That’s OK!


May 30, 2016

In our work as consultants we are often called upon to help leaders and their organizations navigate conflict.

In virtually every instance the leader who enlists our help believes that he or she is not the problem. The real problem, those leaders believe, is “that person” or “those people” or “that policy or procedure” or “that department”.

We’ve seen a lot of jaws drop (and a few fists start to clench!) when we tell leaders “The problem is you!”.

Angry man pointing his finger

What we mean by that is that in every conflict, every individual involved has contributed to the impasse in some way or another. This is one of the fundamental rules of organizational life – that every member of the group is part of a system that is not working on some level.

Now, we want our clients to continue to employ us, so we finish the sentence beginning “The problem is you…” with an important clause: “…so know yourself.”

If I am aware of my limitations and failures and propensities to engage in unhealthy behavior at times then I can lead through the conflict with wisdom and skill.

The writer John Eldredge puts it this way: “What gets in the way is your way”. He means that we all have a way of relating, a manner of leading that we rarely question. And when you don’t question yourself you are not conscious of how your patterns of behavior are affecting others, creating resistance, and undermining the very goals you are committed to bringing about. But if you are willing to take an inward look, you can stop being your own worst enemy.

If you can manage yourself – know your heart and mind and understand how and why you can slip into unhealthy conflict – and then choose instead to put your ego aside for a bigger mission – you have the foundation for persevering through conflict and adversity in a way that bring about lasting change and a unified team and organization.

Do you want to take your team to the next level? Here are some of our options for team development and growth.

Ready to take your individual leadership acumen to a higher place? Check out our options for executive and leadership coaching here.

For more on navigating organizational and interpersonal conflict, read our book Red Zone/Blue Zone, which you can find here.

Unleashing Your Passion For Higher Performance


April 26, 2016

13J0B5G5PY
In our book Your Intentional Difference: One Word Changes Everything we write about the six dimensions of your “ID” that make up the 5% of what you do that ONLY you can do the way you do it.

When you learn to identify and live in your Intentional Difference, you become more fully who you are meant to be in both your personal and professional life.

In a phrase, you are made different to make a difference and – way beyond one book – part of our passion at TAG is to help clients and their teams discover their ID and so start their journeys of unique and effective performance.

One of these critical six dimensions is Driving Passion, which we define as your “energizing, intense appetite which demands action”. It’s that thing you can’t NOT do. It is the fuel, the intense motivation, that motivates you to act and determines the quality of your personal and professional outcomes.

Do you want to know your Driving Passion? It’s our great joy to walk alongside clients and leaders of all stripes as they discover theirs. Here are three questions which offer a place to start:

1. What do I believe is the world’s greatest need?
2. What do others say is the “one thing” for me (text someone right now and ask them!)
3. If I had unlimited time and money what would I do with them?

The key is finding the intersection of human need with my driving motivator and then determining to bring whatever resources I have to bear on acting on both!

Maybe your Driving Passion is found in your work. Or maybe you need to create some margin in your life for your Driving Passion to be expressed. Whatever your strategy, your heart and soul and mind won’t rest until you find your Driving Passion and put it into productive and determined use, every single day!

Want to know more?

You can read about all six dimensions of your ID here.

And if you’d like to talk to a leadership coach about uncovering and unleashing your ID, you can find out more here.